Allegedly Defamatory Tweet About Non-Resident Insufficient to Confer Jurisdiction

This is a lawsuit for defamation brought by Jason Miller. The particular claims in question arise out of a tweet. Miller was an advisor on the Trump campaign and later became a commentator and consultant. He was allegedly involved in…

Another Government Impermissibly Censors Constituents on Facebook--Robinson v. Hunt County

Another Government Impermissibly Censors Constituents on Facebook–Robinson v. Hunt County

This lawsuit alleges censorship by the administrators of the Hunt County Sheriff’s Office Facebook page. The Facebook page invited “input and POSITIVE comments regarding the Hunt County Sheriff’s Office.” The page was intended to discuss “matters of public interest,” but…

Court Says California’s Anti-Spam Statute Doesn’t Regulate Affiliate Networks–Bank v. Hydra

This judgment followed a bench trial in a case over three unwanted email messages. The case was originally filed in 2010! The plaintiff is a lawyer suing pro se. The defendant is Hydra Group, which operated an affiliate network. The…

Tweet Containing Question Mark Isn't Defamatory--Boulger v. Woods

Tweet Containing Question Mark Isn’t Defamatory–Boulger v. Woods

In 2016, the Chicago Tribune published a photo of a woman giving a Nazi salute at a Trump rally. Twitter user @voxday wrongly identified the plaintiff as that woman. Shortly afterwards, actor James Woods, who then had 350,000 twitter users,…

Post-Charlottesville Doxxing and Misidentification Creates Legal Risks--Vangheluwe v. GotNews

Post-Charlottesville Doxxing and Misidentification Creates Legal Risks–Vangheluwe v. GotNews

This is a lawsuit brought by former owners of a car who were incorrectly identified as the driver of the vehicle (and his father, respectively) who ploughed into a crowd of pedestrians in Charlottesville. In the wake of the planned…

Illinois Supreme Court Authorizes Biometric Lawsuits Without Any Allegation of Harm–Rosenbach v. Six Flags

Six Flags, the amusement park operator, allegedly violated Illinois Biometric Privacy Statute by collecting a minor’s fingerprint without consent. The state appeals court held that plaintiff had to allege harm beyond the information collection without consent. The Illinois state supreme…

Blocking Constituents from Facebook Page Violates First Amendment–Davison v. Randall

The Chair of Loudoun County Board of Supervisors blocked a constituent on her official Facebook page. While the block was temporary, Davison, the constituent, filed a lawsuit, and prevailed after a bench trial. The Fourth Circuit affirms the main points….

Screenshotting a Newspaper Page May Infringe a Licensed Photo--Hirsch v. Complex

Screenshotting a Newspaper Page May Infringe a Licensed Photo–Hirsch v. Complex

This is a copyright infringement lawsuit. Hirsch, a professional photographer, took a photo of Santino Boderick, who was an associate of a well-known hiphop artist, Bobby Shmurda. Hirsch licensed the photograph to the New York Post, where it appeared in…

Another Gambling Case Over Online Virtual Coins Proceeds--Wilson v. Playtika

Another Gambling Case Over Online Virtual Coins Proceeds–Wilson v. Playtika

I blogged about Big Fish, who had a trip to the Ninth Circuit and was denied a bid to arbitrate claims against it based on its waiver of the right to arbitrate. As a follow up, I also blogged about…

Gambling App Fails to Create Binding Terms of Service--Wilson v. Huuuge

Gambling App Fails to Create Binding Terms of Service–Wilson v. Huuuge

I’ve blogged about the Big Fish gambling case before Judge Leighton. He declined to order arbitration in that case, finding that Big Fish waived its right to arbitrate by extensively litigating the case. Judge Leighton is hearing some other similar…