EFF Pub Trivia Night Recap

EFF Pub Trivia Night Recap

Last Thursday, I participated in the 7th Annual EFF Pub Trivia Night at Bluxome Street Winery in SOMA. My photo album. The EFF’s Kurt Opsahl was our Master of Ceremonies (in a smoking jacket, no less) and main question-writer. Several…

How The DMCA's Online Copyright Safe Harbor Failed

How The DMCA’s Online Copyright Safe Harbor Failed

[Eric's introductory note: I'm continuing my Spring housecleaning of blog posts that got stuck in draft mode for more than a half-year. I wrote this post in September intending it for Forbes, and some of it got obliquely incorporated into...

Want To Scrub Google Search Results In The US? Tough--O'Kroley v. Fastcase

Want To Scrub Google Search Results In The US? Tough–O’Kroley v. Fastcase

I’m choosing to live in a parallel universe where the ECJ’s Google scrub-search-results ruling simply doesn’t exist. I know it’s a fantasy world, but I’m happier there. Fortunately, here in the US, the ECJ ruling couldn’t happen. The First Amendment…

Court Lauds Blogs "As A Means Of Free Dissemination Of News And Public Comment"--Comins v. Vanvoorhis

Court Lauds Blogs “As A Means Of Free Dissemination Of News And Public Comment”–Comins v. Vanvoorhis

A number of states have “retraction” laws that require plaintiffs to demand a retraction from media defendants before suing for defamation. How these laws apply to Internet publishers arose early in the development of Internet jurisprudence. For example, in the…

Of Course The First Amendment Protects Baidu's Search Engine, Even When It Censors Pro-Democracy Results (Forbes Cross-Post)

Of Course The First Amendment Protects Baidu’s Search Engine, Even When It Censors Pro-Democracy Results (Forbes Cross-Post)

Baidu.com is the leading search engine in China. The plaintiffs in this case have published materials online about the democracy movement in China. They allege that, at the request of the Chinese government, Baidu excludes pro-democracy search results, including their…

47 USC 230's Legislative History

47 USC 230′s Legislative History

I had reason to revisit the legislative history for 47 USC 230, which was Section 509 of the Telecommunications Act of 1996.[FN1] For some reason, I had trouble retrieving it through typical Google searches, so I’m sharing it here for…

Epinions, The Path-Breaking Website, Is Dead. Some Lessons It Taught Us (Forbes Cross-Post)

Epinions, The Path-Breaking Website, Is Dead. Some Lessons It Taught Us (Forbes Cross-Post)

Before Yelp and TripAdvisor, before blogs or social media, there was Epinions.com. Founded in 1999, Epinions was a consumer review website before we fully appreciated how much we needed consumer reviews. It made several advances over other websites of its…

Talk on Why State Legislatures Shouldn't Regulate Internet Privacy

Talk on Why State Legislatures Shouldn’t Regulate Internet Privacy

As regular readers know, I view state legislatures as currently the #1 threat to the Internet’s integrity. In the name of “protecting the kids” and “helping the Internet”, state legislatures are manufacturing a slew of anti-innovation laws that cumulatively threaten…

H2 2013 Quick Links, Part 5 (Miscellaneous)

H2 2013 Quick Links, Part 5 (Miscellaneous)

* Ars Technica: How the feds took down the Dread Pirate Roberts. A great story on how hard it is to remain anonymous online against determined federal agents. * Nice Reuters retrospective on Judge Rader. * DailyDot: The battle to destroy Wikipedia’s biggest sockpuppet army. Related: Is Wikipedia…

Top Ten Internet Law Developments Of 2013 (Forbes Cross-Post)

Top Ten Internet Law Developments Of 2013 (Forbes Cross-Post)

A look back at the Internet law highlights of 2013: #10: Copyright Defendants Get High-Stakes Wins. 2013 saw several copyright defendants win long-running litigation affairs–and potentially crack open new markets, including (1) Google’s stirring win in its nearly decade-long Google…