Goldman's Observations 2015-08-04T20:09:59Z http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/feed/atom WordPress Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Newly Listed: Awesome Sunnyvale Condo Within Biking Distance of Apple]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=2055 2015-08-04T20:09:59Z 2015-08-04T20:09:59Z Today we listed my mom’s 2 bedroom + loft/2 bath Sunnyvale condo, located in the highly desirable Stratford Gardens development. Although it’s a condo, it feels a little like a single-family home because it has a lovely and large private deck, lots of space (nearly 2,000 square feet), a 2 car garage with extra storage space, and the privacy of being an end unit. It also has some of the advantages of being in a nice condominium development, including gated entry, a beautiful pool just steps away from the unit, and park-like grounds.

The Sunnyvale location is terrific. It’s just blocks away from prime shopping districts along El Camino and Fremont Avenue (including one of my favorites, the ever-popular Falafel Stop). It’s easy to get to both 101 and 280, and it’s a short bike ride to Apple’s current and new headquarters.

The location is 457 Ives Terrace, and it’s listed for $1,198,000. We’re going to have open houses this weekend, Saturday and Sunday 1:30-4:30. I’d be grateful if you could help spread the words to your friends!

Here’s a front view of the condo:

457 Ives Terrace

See the entire virtual tour and the Trulia page.

If you’re interested in more details, contact Nil Erdal .

Also on the market:

* Angels Camp investment property
* Forest Meadows “mountain” home

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Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Newly Listed: My Mom’s “Mountain Home” in the Sierra Foothills]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=2050 2015-07-30T22:09:21Z 2015-07-30T22:09:21Z I’m continuing to liquidate the real estate portfolio left by my mom’s death. We just listed my mom’s “second home,” which is a little misleading because my mom had several “second” homes. This particular one was a long-time family favorite, and while we’re sad to see it go, it’s time to let another family love it.

It’s located in the Sierra foothills along the Highway 4 corridor, just outside of the cutesy and trendy Gold Rush town of Murphys. If you’ve never been to the Highway 4 corridor, you might be surprised how it’s jam-packed with fun activities: skiing in the winter at Bear Valley, hiking at all elevation levels, awesome sequoias at Big Trees State Park, wineries, historical towns, several fun caves to tour, and so much more. The house is located in a gated development called Forest Meadows at an elevation high enough to have beautiful trees and low enough to avoid most snow in the winter.

The house itself has a great layout for family getaways, with a master bedroom on one side and two kids’ bedrooms plus a den on the other side. Right behind the house is a bunch of community amenities, including a pool, park and tennis courts. To make it even easier to move in, we’re including the furnishings as part of the sale.

The listing price is $249,000, which you’ll see compares quite favorably to the prices shown on Zillow. See the full Zillow listing, which includes a full photo album. Here’s the front view:

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If you’re interested, contact Duane Papais at (209) 728-8000 Ext.108 or fmp@goldrush.com.

Also on the market: an investment property in Angels Camp.

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Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Just Listed: Income-Producing Commercial Building in Angels Camp]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=2024 2015-07-15T22:48:49Z 2015-07-15T22:48:49Z [My mom had a portfolio of 15 real estate properties, and I now spend my days and nights managing them until I can get them sold. I’m excited to bring to market this attractive income-producing opportunity in the bustling Gold Country.]

Just listed: 1177-89 South Main Street (Highway 49), Old Town Angels Camp. The building is 3,396 square feet of retail space, 100% leased by an antique shop, Now and Then Treasures. The current rent of $1,500/month projects to an annual income of $18,000. The offering price is only $209,000, which makes this a super opportunity if you’re looking for a “starter” commercial real estate investment.

In addition to its location right on world-famous Highway 49 in a charming and historic part of Angels Camp, the building’s thick riolite stone walls gives it some character you might associate with California of yore. Some photos of the building front:

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If you’re interested, contact me or Duane Papais, fmp@goldrush.com.

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Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Memorial For My Mom At The ALA Annual Meeting (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=2010 2015-07-13T18:07:30Z 2015-07-13T18:04:00Z At the ALA Annual Meeting in San Francisco at the end of June, we had a memorial session for my mom. I think about 100 people showed up.

The session started with the current ALA president, Courtney Young, presenting us with a framed resolution from the ALA Executive Board (see photo). The text reads:

The ALA Executive Board recognizes Gail Schlachter:

– For her decades of service to the library and information fields as a reference librarian, library administrator, library educator, author of library-oriented reference works and reviewer of reference resources;

– For her service as president of the American Library Association’s Reference and User Services Association (RUSA) — 1988-89;

– For her five terms on the ALA Counsel, as well as numerous committee appointments;

– For her service on the ALA Executive Board;

– But most importantly, for her mentorship, friendship and infectious smile.

Gail’s contributions will long be remembered, her presence sorely missed.

[signed by Keith Michael Fiels, ALA Executive Director, and Courtney L. Young, ALA President]

This touching tribute meant a lot to us.

We then opened up the microphone for everyone to share their remembrances. Over 15 people came forward to share their stories spanning five decades. There were a lot of laughs, and some tears were shed. Although I’ve been living with my mom’s death every minute for the past 2 months, her sudden loss still felt fairly raw in the library community. I think the memorial helped the community with a little more closure.

At the memorial, my sister Sandy Hirsh kicked off the open-mike session with another eulogy. You may recall that she gave a eulogy at our prior celebration in May, but this one was targeted more at the library community. Her remarks:
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Sandy Hirsh’s Eulogy for Gail Schlachter
Delivered June 29, 2015
American Library Association Annual Conference, San Francisco

My mom knew that I was destined to be a librarian — long before I did. I always said that I didn’t know what I wanted to be when I grew up, but I knew what I didn’t want to be –- and that was a librarian! But my mom never lost faith.

It was her always-sage advice that was a key factor in my choosing library and information science for my career. I was at a cross roads when I was completing my political science degree at UCLA, as I didn’t know what I wanted to do next. She was undeterred by my previous declaration, and suggested that I consider going to library school. She made very compelling points that appealed to my sense of pragmatism. She said: “You will always be employable with a library degree and you can always apply whatever you learn in library school to anything else you choose to do in the future.” And with this, she launched my career into this remarkable field.

Sandy Hirsh and Gail Schlachter

Sandy Hirsh and Gail Schlachter

My mom and I enjoyed being in the profession together. Some of our favorite stories to tell were how we taught the same class (reference, of course) at the same time for San Jose State University — although she taught it on the main campus and I taught it at their satellite campus in Fullerton. She involved me in her publishing company’s, Reference Service Press, work too; I co-edited a couple of Reference Service Press’s Directories of Financial Aid with her. This year, we both were invited to serve on the Credo Advisory Board and we traveled to Boston together for the board meeting in September. Over the last 5 years, she was absolutely bursting with pride that I was the director of the School of Information at SJSU University. I am sure many of you have witnessed this! She loved to tell people how funny she found it that she was now known as “Sandy Hirsh’s mother” rather than me being called “Gail Schlachter’s daughter”. She enjoyed how I had become chair of committees she had previously chaired. In fact, she became the ALA Executive Board liaison to the ALA American Libraries Advisory Committee that I was chairing this year and she attended our meeting at the Midwinter conference! She was especially excited that I was running for IRRT (International Relations Roundtable) ALA Councilor and had asked, if I were to win, if I would be her Council buddy and let her sit next to me. I did win, but she never heard this news.

My mom was a wonderful role model — through her passion for the profession, her work ethic, her caring for others, her interest in everyone’s success, her mentorship, her focus on quality, and her generosity. Throughout my life, my mom was always ready to listen, provide thoughtful advice, help in any way, celebrate every accomplishment, and cheer me on. I have learned over the years, and the point was made again and again after her untimely death, that while she might be expected to extend herself in these ways as my mother, she actually was like this with lots of people! While I thought she was my own personal cheerleader, she actually was cheering on numerous other people in the profession, other members of our family, and many of her friends and acquaintances.

In fact, as I reflect on her life, I think one of my mom’s greatest super powers was the gift she had for building relationships and friendships. She had the ability to make everyone feel like she was their special friend — and this empowered them and helped them feel confident and helped contribute to their success. I don’t know how she had enough hours in the day to run her own publishing company, take care of her family, manage her real estate, and engage with so many people in such a caring, supportive, and engaged way!

She used to talk about how she was “small but mighty”. How true this was! She leaves a big legacy through her numerous professional contributions to ALA, her reference publications which have helped countless people advance their education, her generosity through the Reference Service Press scholarships and awards she gave through ALA RUSA and the California Library Association, her family whom she loved and devoted so much of herself to, and her friends, colleagues and acquaintances who she valued and made feel special. She leaves a huge hole in both my life and in the field. I try to remind myself that she is still at our side – coaching, mentoring, cheering, caring, celebrating, listening, helping, encouraging, smiling, laughing, and inspiring us. I know she has left a lasting legacy and her contributions will not be quickly forgotten. May her love for ALA, reference service, and the library and information science profession live on and continue to inspire us to be impactful and accomplish great things!
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Blog Posts About Gail Schlachter Hauser’s Death

* Patricia Schuman’s Remembrance of Gail Schlachter Hauser (1943-2015)
* Dimi Berkner’s Eulogy For My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* Remembrance From My Mom’s Lifelong Friend, David Weber (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* Remembrance from Sumyyah Bilal
* An Example of How My Mom’s Books Helped Students (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* My Sister’s Eulogy For Our Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* My Eulogy For My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* From my wife: Gail Schlachter, My Mother-in-law, Remembered
* Selected Remembrances of Gail Schlachter Hauser (1943-2015)
* My First Mother’s Day Without My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* Signs That My Mom Is Still Thinking of Us (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* My Mom’s Idea of a “Really Good Day” (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* Initial Reflections on Losing a Parent (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* My Mom Died: Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015

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Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Patricia Schuman’s Remembrance of Gail Schlachter Hauser (1943-2015)]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1996 2015-06-26T20:18:23Z 2015-06-26T20:13:01Z
Gail Schlachter, Palo Alto

Gail Schlachter, Palo Alto

This remembrance is from Patricia Glass Schuman, who was President of ALA, 1991-1992; Treasurer of ALA, 1984-1988; and President, Neal-Schuman Publishers, 1976-2011. Pat’s remembrance is a selection from a collection of memories by librarian and publishing colleagues that will be published in Reference and User Services Quarterly (RUSQ) (volume 55, issue 1, Fall 2015). Gail was editor of RUSQ from 1997-2000. RUSQ is the scholarly journal of the American Library Association’s Reference and User Services Association and is available at http://journals.ala.org/rusq/. Many thanks to Pat and RUSQ for sharing.
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An ALA friend says: “ALA conference is like Brigadoon. It is a small town that happens twice a year, and then disappears until the next time.” How true that is for me–having attended close to 100 conferences. And, like the inhabitants of most small towns, there were friends I bonded with almost immediately.

Gail Schlachter was a “Brigadoon” friend. Oh yes, we occasionally ran into each other at another library conference. And yes, we always meant to get together outside of conference, but only managed that once or twice. As we both became more involved, busier and busier (probably my fault mostly), we rarely even found time for a drink in later years. Nevertheless the connection was there. There were smiles (hers was always radiant), hugs, and a quick catch-up–husbands, friends, children, business, ALA politics.

The first time we met we talked for hours. We were both from similar cultural backgrounds, divorced, transitioning from work in a library setting to publishing. We were young, active and passionate librarians–convinced of our profession’s power to make a difference. The conversations got shorter as we both founded businesses, became more enmeshed in ALA, and took on greater time obligations–but it never stopped. Neither did the smiles or the hugs. And we both talked fast! We called each other “mentors” because advice was free-flowing, one librarian/publisher/businesswoman to another.

I have many fond memories of Gail, personal and professional. What I remember most is her unstinting encouragement. One example took place at the California Library Association debate for ALA President. This was the first of several debates with my opponent, Patrick O’Brien. I was VERY nervous. Gail rehearsed me, and she cautioned; “Let your passion shine through–be a GREAT ALA President–let them see that.” I believed her and calmed down. She sat in the front row and smiled her glorious smile at me during the entire debate.

When Gail asked me to speak at her RASD (Reference and Adult Services Division, now RUSA) President’s Program about Technology and the Future of Libraries…I asked “why me?” Gail had arranged to show Steve Jobs on video, and for others to demonstrate innovative technologies. I was the only “live” speaker. Gail said: “I want an overview, a perceptive look at the human and societal implications”. When the time came and I arrived to speak I found that the room had all the bells and whistles available in the late 80’s–but there was no microphone or podium for me! The people in charge said it was too late. I panicked, but Gail, with her sweet smile, and her determined “don’t take no for an answer” attitude, had the podium delivered in time for my speech! That speech, which Gail inspired, led to articles in Library Journal and the Whole Earth Review.

A wise friend told me that when someone close to you dies you lose not only that person, but that person’s view of you. Very selfishly–I miss both terribly.
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There will be another memorial service for Gail Schlachter at the ALA Annual Meeting in San Francisco, June 28, 5 pm.
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Blog Posts About Gail Schlachter Hauser’s Death

* Dimi Berkner’s Eulogy For My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* Remembrance From My Mom’s Lifelong Friend, David Weber (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* Remembrance from Sumyyah Bilal
* An Example of How My Mom’s Books Helped Students (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* My Sister’s Eulogy For Our Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* My Eulogy For My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* From my wife: Gail Schlachter, My Mother-in-law, Remembered
* Selected Remembrances of Gail Schlachter Hauser (1943-2015)
* My First Mother’s Day Without My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* Signs That My Mom Is Still Thinking of Us (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* My Mom’s Idea of a “Really Good Day” (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* Initial Reflections on Losing a Parent (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* My Mom Died: Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015

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Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Dimi Berkner’s Eulogy For My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1975 2015-06-25T15:03:05Z 2015-06-25T15:03:05Z
Gail Schlachter, Palo Alto

Gail Schlachter, Palo Alto

At my mom’s memorial service, we asked her long-time friend Dimi Berkner to say some words. Her eulogy:
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Gail will be honored and celebrated for her fierce dedication to libraries and ALA and for her contribution to reference publishing. Our relationship was also built on those interests, but it was much more a friendship between two kindred spirits.

The year was 1971; the place was the University of Southern California Library. I was at my desk when this cheerful, intense, confident and determined little woman with a distinctive accent introduced herself to me. She said, “I teach social science book selection in the Library School. I understand you’ve just been hired to do social science book selection in the library. Would you like to come and talk to my class about how you do your job?”

And that was the beginning of a beautiful friendship that lasted 44 years through both of our careers in libraries and in publishing, through children and spouses, moving and changing, illness and recovery, happiness and loss. Gail was such a dear friend, such an amazing woman, such a role model for me: her dedication and work with ALA, where she ultimately achieved the influential executive position she’d worked toward for so many years; her entrepreneurial spirit–founding and maintaining her own unique reference publishing company, a company that has provided essential access for generations of students seeking higher education; her passion for real estate–she taught me that the best use of a Sunday afternoon in California was to go open houses and keep up with the real estate trends where you’d like to live; her boundless energy and love of learning, as her many degrees and ongoing projects demonstrated; and especially her love and support of her family, which motivated her recent move to this area.

We didn’t see each other that often in the last few years as our life circumstances changed, but we maintained our relationship and our caring for each other. We could pick up a conversation without hesitation two years after the last get-together; she made the time to attend both of my children’s weddings on opposite coasts and my husband’s memorial; we shared ideas, dreams, successes, life changes, and continued hope for the future. I was lucky and blessed to have celebrated her birthday dinner with her just five days before her operation, and I will have those happy memories of our last time together. Gail left us all much too soon, and we will miss her terribly.
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There will be another memorial service for Gail Schlachter at the ALA Annual Meeting in San Francisco, June 28, 5 pm.
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Blog Posts About Gail Schlachter Hauser’s Death

* Remembrance From My Mom’s Lifelong Friend, David Weber (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* Remembrance from Sumyyah Bilal
* An Example of How My Mom’s Books Helped Students (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* My Sister’s Eulogy For Our Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* My Eulogy For My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* From my wife: Gail Schlachter, My Mother-in-law, Remembered
* Selected Remembrances of Gail Schlachter Hauser (1943-2015)
* My First Mother’s Day Without My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* Signs That My Mom Is Still Thinking of Us (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* My Mom’s Idea of a “Really Good Day” (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* Initial Reflections on Losing a Parent (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* My Mom Died: Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015

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Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Remembrance From My Mom’s Lifelong Friend, David Weber (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1970 2015-06-18T18:13:04Z 2015-06-18T17:53:55Z
Gail Schlachter, Palo Alto

Gail Schlachter, Palo Alto

I have several remembrances of my mom that have surfaced in the past few weeks. I’ll be sharing them in due course. I’ll start with this remembrance from David Weber, a friend of my mom for 50 years. David became my mom’s co-author on her books, adding an incredibly important professional connection to their long-standing personal one. We would have asked David to give a eulogy at the memorial service, but he had an irreconcilable conflict, so instead he sent the following remarks for us to read at the service:
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Circumstances beyond my control forced me to make a difficult decision about which coast of the country to spend today. I could either be in Boston, where I had long-standing hotel and airline reservations, for the graduation of my daughter from college or in the San Francisco Bay area for a memorial service for my longest-lasting and best friend. Reluctantly, I chose to have my body in the Boston University Stadium, but my heart and soul will be split between activities there and being with you.

Aside from her brother and some cousins, I knew Gail longer than any of you did. Sandy and I have reminisced about when I first met her, a couple of weeks before she was born, and her poor petite Mom lumbered around the campus of the University of Wisconsin, agonizing about whether her first child would ever be born. In more than half a century, I had the pleasure of knowing Gail in many capacities. Like all of you, I knew her as a loyal and devoted friend, one who gave much more to the relationship than any of us could ever give back. I knew her as a librarian, a single person who made a huge impact on that very large profession. Sandy and Eric knew her as a Mom who contributed so much to making them such successful and highly-regarded members of their own professions today. Hayley, Leah, Jacob, and Dina knew her as the world’s greatest grandma.

Although I could talk about any of the many dimensions of our dear friend, I have chosen to limit myself today to her work as a publisher. Many people have contributed to the success of Reference Service Press over the years. In the early days, Gail’s mother kept the company solvent with her meticulous bookkeeping and relentless pursuit of customers who failed to pay their bills. Sandy and Eric helped with the actual cutting and pasting of text in those early pre-computer days and then helped fill orders from the company’s warehouse, i.e. the basement of Gail’s parents’ apartment. When computer technology pulled type-setting out of the early days of the company’s operations, Martin Sklar wrote the programs that transformed material on floppy disks into finished books. After Martin’s illness and death, Mike Fields replaced him as computer programmer par excellence. After Stuart Hauser joined Gail in a happy and rewarding marriage, he took on the role of managing the by-then real warehouse and all of its operations, including manufacturing the spine-bound books-on-demand. Recently, Dena Ringen wrote the programs that have transformed the database into an electronically-searchable version. Early on, Gail invited me to help write the actual programs, and over the last quarter century I have spent the bulk of my living hours writing up and updating programs for all of our books. Last summer, I enjoyed sending Gail a picture of myself on the beach in Puerto Vallarta, laptop in place, as I tapped away on our latest project of updating a technical feature of the database.

Despite all the assistance and participation of so many of us, Reference Service Press was never anything without the inspiration and genius of Gail Schlachter. She was always the person with the vision of what the company could be. As technology and the market for books changed over the years, Gail was also the one whose instincts told her where the company needed to go, how it needed to change and evolve. As the company curmudgeon, I used to tell her that change would be too difficult, that her proposals were undoable, that we needed to keep doing what we had always done. After a while, I learned to keep my mouth shut. She was always right. She always knew what was best. She just had a knack for understanding how to run a business, specifically a business devoted to books and then other resources on financial aid. She thought of new books that we could publish. She wrote all the introductory material for the books. She designed the format of the books, down to and including the art work for the covers, the arrangement of the text, the style of the printing, the material to cover in the indexes. She was the company.

Now that she is gone, those of us who worked with her are anxious to keep the company going. We believe it performed a valuable service that should be continued. Maybe we will, maybe we won’t. Even if we do manage to keep Gail’s legacy alive by keeping the company in operation, it will never be quite the same. There always was, and always will be, only one Gail Ann Schlachter.
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For another professional perspective about my mom, see this remembrance from Sumyyah Bilal, who helped run my mom’s electronic editions.
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There will be another memorial service for Gail Schlachter at the ALA Annual Meeting in San Francisco, June 28, 5 pm.
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Blog Posts About Gail Schlachter Hauser’s Death

* Remembrance from Sumyyah Bilal
* An Example of How My Mom’s Books Helped Students (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* My Sister’s Eulogy For Our Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* My Eulogy For My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* From my wife: Gail Schlachter, My Mother-in-law, Remembered
* Selected Remembrances of Gail Schlachter Hauser (1943-2015)
* My First Mother’s Day Without My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* Signs That My Mom Is Still Thinking of Us (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* My Mom’s Idea of a “Really Good Day” (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* Initial Reflections on Losing a Parent (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* My Mom Died: Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015

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Eric Goldman <![CDATA[An Example of How My Mom’s Books Helped Students (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1987 2015-06-11T16:10:21Z 2015-06-11T16:10:21Z
Gail Schlachter, Palo Alto

Gail Schlachter, Palo Alto

On my trip to Korea, I met Shubha Gokhale, a professor at Hankuk University of Foreign Studies in Seoul. After mentioning my mom’s death, Shubha sent me this wonderful comment that reinforces the many ways my mom’s work made the world a better place:

I discovered that I was obsessed with your mother, Ms. Schlachter’s, books in high school! Her writings helped me understand and apply for many scholarships and financial aid.

Coming from a low income background, with a single mother and three sisters, I did not think that I would ever have a chance to get a good university education. However, these books in the local library helped my sisters and I apply to and graduate from well ranked universities. I was even able to dream of law school because of my low undergraduate debt!

I feel so grateful towards your mother! She truly changed my entire family’s life. Despite my father’s untimely death, our family was able to overcome what seemed to be insurmountable financial challenges. Thank you so very much!

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There will be another memorial service for Gail Schlachter at the ALA Annual Meeting in San Francisco, June 28, 5 pm.
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Blog Posts About Gail Schlachter Hauser’s Death

* My Sister’s Eulogy For Our Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* My Eulogy For My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* From my wife: Gail Schlachter, My Mother-in-law, Remembered
* Selected Remembrances of Gail Schlachter Hauser (1943-2015)
* My First Mother’s Day Without My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* Signs That My Mom Is Still Thinking of Us (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* My Mom’s Idea of a “Really Good Day” (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* Initial Reflections on Losing a Parent (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* My Mom Died: Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015

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Eric Goldman <![CDATA[My Sister’s Eulogy For Our Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1977 2015-06-11T16:01:52Z 2015-06-02T13:52:59Z
Gail Schlachter, Palo Alto

Gail Schlachter, Palo Alto

We had a memorial service for my mom, Gail Schlachter Hauser, a couple weeks ago. My sister’s eulogy:
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Eulogy for My Mom: Gail Schlachter
By Sandy Hirsh
May 17, 2015

What do “energizer bunny”, “effervescent schlachter”, “small but mighty”, “a great friend”, and “a true icon” have in common? These are just some of the words that people have used to describe my mom. Her passion, enthusiasm, and high energy were infectious, her commitment, hard work, and high standards made her admirable and a role model, and her caring for and interest in others made her endearing to everyone who knew her. However, for me, she was first and foremost a loving and devoted mother, and I always felt extremely lucky.

Recently my mom had been reflecting on her own mortality. She told us that her biggest concern was that she wouldn’t know what was going on with us after she was gone – and she couldn’t stand the idea of that. She asked us to “talk” to her regularly. She said she wasn’t a mind reader and she wanted us to tell her about our lives and what was happening in them.

I think we all know why this was a concern for her. She made it a point during her life to attend every event, no matter how big or small, no matter the distance. She would drive all day to attend a baby shower, a dance performance, a school event, a birthday party and then turn right around and drive back the same night. In fact, my cousins and I were just talking about how we were “pulling a Gail” by traveling between Los Angeles and the Bay Area and back again in the same day.

Before the digital age, she loved to document these events with her trusty Polaroid camera – capturing these special moments for posterity. She never was embarrassed to run up to the front of the stage to snap a photo of me or my brother and she delighted at seeing the instantaneous results.

In addition to attending events, she was also a good phone talker! I inherited this skill from her too. She had her regulars who she talked to on a daily basis — and sometimes multiple times a day! I was one of those people. She was a great listener and always so interested in whatever was going on in my life – from daily annoyances, to the library profession, to her grandchildren, to our next trip, to our dogs – really nothing was too big or too small.

Because she was so present — at both special events and everyday events and in person and on the phone — she is woven into the fabric of every memory. And for me, because we shared the same profession, she is also fully intertwined with my professional memories as well. I feel fortunate to have so many wonderful memories to treasure. However, at the same time, it leaves a huge hole in my life and for many other people too.

I know that as much as I am aching from this, she is equally worried about missing out on what is going on in mine and in the lives of the many people she loved so deeply. Well, today, I am telling her that many of the people who love her came together to cherish memories of her, to celebrate a life well lived, to treasure the moments that they got to spend with her, to agree to keep her memory and legacy alive, and, most importantly, to promise that they will continue telling her about their lives so she won’t have to miss out.
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There will be another memorial service for Gail Schlachter at the ALA Annual Meeting in San Francisco, June 28, 5 pm.
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Blog Posts About Gail Schlachter Hauser’s Death

* My Eulogy For My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* From my wife: Gail Schlachter, My Mother-in-law, Remembered
* Selected Remembrances of Gail Schlachter Hauser (1943-2015)
* My First Mother’s Day Without My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* Signs That My Mom Is Still Thinking of Us (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* My Mom’s Idea of a “Really Good Day” (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* Initial Reflections on Losing a Parent (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* My Mom Died: Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015

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Eric Goldman <![CDATA[My Eulogy For My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1973 2015-05-22T15:36:14Z 2015-05-21T16:24:02Z
My mom loved desserts, and these were some of her favorites

My mom loved desserts, and these were some of her favorites

On Sunday, we celebrated the life of my mom, Gail Schlachter. We had a full house of about 80 people. We did some readings, said the Mourner’s Kaddish, had some eulogies, watched a slideshow (with “(I Had) The Time of My Life” playing over it, per my mom’s request), reviewed and commented on her life timeline, and ate her favorite desserts. I hope to post the slideshow soon.

I will be posting some of the eulogies here. We asked speakers to limit themselves to 5 minutes (which, I believe, everyone respected), so that will help explain why mine seems so brief. There were a thousand different ways I could have taken the eulogy, so I found this one of the hardest projects to write that I’ve faced for some time. Here’s what I ended up with:

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I want to thank you for coming here today. I know many of you made special efforts to be here, and that means a lot to us.

My mom raised my sister and me as a single parent. This fact defines our identity. For my mom, it meant many years of extra sacrifices, above and beyond the sacrifices that parents typically make. I still can’t figure out how she did it—and I was there! For my sister and me, it meant she had to be both our mom and dad. Still, there always seemed to be enough love to fill the whole household.

Today, we might call my mom a Tiger Mom. She would tell me daily to “Get All As,” even years after my graduation. Getting all As wasn’t a goal or a request, it was an expectation. No matter how proud I made my mom with my achievements, I always knew she expected even more from me. For 47 years, I have been striving to meet those high expectations, and I’ll keep trying for the rest of my life. So although my mom’s direct contributions to the world have come to an end, Sandy and I (and our children) will continue to extend her legacy with the accomplishments we have yet to make, guided by the values and lessons we got from her.

A couple of days ago, I spoke with a woman who bought a book right before my mom’s death and didn’t understand why the book hadn’t arrived. She had a surprising undercurrent of desperation in her voice. I realized she hadn’t just bought a book; she had bought a key that she hoped would help unlock her professional and personal dreams. Without that key, her dreams might be unobtainable. The book didn’t cost that much, but it was an incredibly high-stakes purchase for her.

Multiply this story by many tens of thousands of other readers of the books, and my mom’s true legacy becomes clearer. With each reader who improved his or her professional skills and knowledge through their education paid for with help from the books, my mom’s books helped enhance society’s storehouse of human capital. Indirectly, then, all of us have benefited from a society made richer by my mom’s books.

My mom often described herself as “small but mighty,” and today we remember her mighty impact on me, on our family, on our community, and on the world at large. Thank you again for coming today to help us celebrate her life and her memory.
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There will be another memorial service for Gail Schlachter at the ALA Annual Meeting in San Francisco, June 28, 5 pm.
__

Blog Posts About Gail Schlachter Hauser’s Death

* From my wife: Gail Schlachter, My Mother-in-law, Remembered
* Selected Remembrances of Gail Schlachter Hauser (1943-2015)
* My First Mother’s Day Without My Mom (Gail Schlachter Hauser 1943-2015)
* Signs That My Mom Is Still Thinking of Us (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* My Mom’s Idea of a “Really Good Day” (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* Initial Reflections on Losing a Parent (Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015)
* My Mom Died: Gail Schlachter Hauser, 1943-2015

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