Goldman's Observations 2014-07-23T16:51:21Z http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/feed/atom WordPress Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Lung Cancer Isn’t Just Life-Changing. It’s Community-Changing (LinkedIn Influencer Cross-Post)]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1820 2014-07-23T16:51:21Z 2014-07-23T16:27:52Z Being diagnosed with cancer terrifies all of us. In the best case, a cancer diagnosis involves painful or sickening treatments. In the worst case, a cancer diagnosis is an imminent death sentence. Either way, a cancer diagnosis instantly changes the victim’s life.

That’s usually true for family members residing with a cancer victim as well. Inevitably, they take on additional caregiver duties; and they too suffer the emotional toll associated with watching someone they love fighting for their lives. One person has cancer, but the whole family bears cancer’s burden.

When the doctor said my wife had lung cancer, I knew her life, and my life, and the lives of our young kids, would never be the same. What I didn’t appreciate was how other people’s lives were about to change as well.

Financial Implications

Cancer is an expensive disease. Treatments can cost millions; so much that cancer patients can run into health insurance policies’ lifetime maximum cap. Overall, Americans spend over $100 billion a year treating cancer. But cancer’s financial costs go well beyond healthcare costs.

In response to my wife’s diagnosis, my mom is moving from her Sacramento suburb (2.5 hours from us) into our Bay Area peninsula neighborhood. This might sound like the kind of sacrifice we expect moms to make for their children, but this move was hardly routine. It requires relocating my stepfather from his assisted living home, relocating her publishing business, and closing four real estate transactions (selling 2 residential properties and her office building plus buying a new residence). All told, my mom’s move implicates hundreds of thousands of dollars of healthcare expenses for my stepfather, a loss of jobs and revenue from her current community, and millions of dollars of real estate transactions. Who would have thought my wife’s lungs had such financial implications?

With such enormous economic stakes associated with a single cancer diagnosis, we must continue to invest in research for better detection tools and treatment options. Cancer isn’t just a plague on our family; it’s a drain on our society and our economy.

Implications for My Colleague

Previously, I could work hard building my career because my stay-at-home wife took primary responsibility for raising our children and running our household. Not surprisingly, my professional commitments became untenable when my wife no longer could handle those responsibilities.

I direct my law school’s High Tech Law Institute (HTLI), a key academic program at the law school. The directorship is a demanding job, consuming a lot of my time (including weekends and evenings) and attention. In light of my new caregiver responsibilities for my wife plus taking over her childcare and household responsibilities, I no longer could devote the necessary attention to the job.

Finding a successor isn’t easy. Most professors hate administrative duties, and not every professor has the skillset or personality to succeed in the job.

Co-ConspiratorsFortunately, my colleague Brian Love, a patent scholar we hired in 2012, has the skills and personality to handle the job and didn’t categorically reject the idea of taking on additional administrative duties.

Unfortunately, Brian is untenured, and the director’s role can make it harder to get tenure. First, the administrative duties can be a major distraction from the other tasks required to get tenure. At minimum, Brian will have to work hard to satisfy the director’s duties and complete the tenure requirements. Second, an administrative director often makes unpopular and occasionally risky decisions—all of which could be cited against the tenure candidate come tenure-time. Brian, despite all of these downsides, graciously agreed to co-direct the HTLI with me nonetheless.

Thus, my wife’s lung cancer required me to change my professional duties, which led to my colleague making a risky and time-consuming professional move. Furthermore, when Brian attends evening and weekend events that require the director’s attendance, his wife likely will bear more childcare responsibilities for their young child.

In other words, my wife’s lungs directly affects the life of my colleague’s spouse, four social network “hops” away from her.

Cancer Destroys Communities, But It Also Builds Them

Hundreds of people have been affected, directly or indirectly, by my wife’s diagnosis. But amidst of all of this disruption, we have seen amazing generosity from expected and unexpected sources. For example, we joined a synagogue a couple months before the diagnosis, and we had just started meeting other members. When members learned about my wife’s cancer, we were inundated with offers of support: dinners, playdates, childcare, rides and so much more. It was incredible to feel so much love from a group of people we hardly knew. It’s shown us what it really means for a community to care about its members. It took a tragedy to learn that lesson, but it would have been a tragedy if we’d never learned it.

]]>
0
Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Join Team Lisa at “Your Next Step is the Cure” 5K, San Francisco, Sept. 21]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1824 2014-07-17T16:51:07Z 2014-07-17T16:51:07Z You recall that my wife Lisa has lung cancer. There is a seemingly endless supply of athletic fundraisers for cancer generally and lung cancer specifically, and we appreciate how family and friends have organized “Team Lisa” tributes at several of these events.

1064777_7313115536921The 6th Annual Your Next Step is the Cure San Francisco, CA 5K, by the Bonnie J. Addario Lung Cancer Foundation, is another fundraiser in the genre, but with a big difference. For the first time, Lisa is organizing her own Team Lisa, and we anticipate the entire Goldman family (Lisa, me and the kids) will be there to participate. We have benefited substantially from the help of the Addario Foundation, and we are happy to support their work.

The event is September 21, 2014, at Lake Merced in San Francisco. They will have both a run and a walk. The Goldman family will be doing the walk. If you are able to join Team Lisa, pre-registration is $30. If you can’t join us in person but still want to donate, there is a donations page.

I’m excited about enjoying another beautiful day in California as our family and friends walk together to support Lisa. We hope to see you on September 21!

]]>
0
Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Reflecting On 8 Years As HTLI Director]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1784 2014-06-02T19:30:58Z 2014-06-02T18:53:01Z Co-ConspiratorsWe recently announced that Brian Love is joining me as co-director of the High Tech Law Institute. This is a good news/bad news announcement. Brian is a terrific talent, and I’m thrilled to work with him. However, given that he’s still pre-tenure, Brian’s new role is a bit early. The timing is driven by my wife’s lung cancer, which has limited my ability to handle the director job. Brian is stepping up at our time of need, but I think this move would have made more sense a few years from now, not today.

Although I plan to remain integrally involved with the High Tech Law Institute as a co-director, this transition has prompted me to reflect on my activities as a director since I took the role in July 2006. Here are some of my highlights from the past 8 years:

New Institutions

Some of the programs we’ve added:

* Entrepreneurs’ Law Clinic. This clinic filled an obvious and long-standing gap in our high tech curricular offerings. It’s also been a foundational piece of efforts to tie together the cross-university programs for entrepreneurs.

* Internet Law Work-in-Progress Conference. There are many work-in-progress events, but it turns out that Internet law scholars really wanted and needed a venue to connect with each other.

* Privacy Law Certificate. Privacy law is a growth industry, and Santa Clara Law plans to stock the privacy community with well-qualified candidates. This certificate is substantially more rigorous than typical law school certificates, and I believe its competency-based approach and rigorous requirements represents the wave of the future for law school certificates.

* High Tech Graduation Brunch. One last chance for high tech students to bond with each other before they leave the nest.

* HTLI Endowment. This is an internal matter but one of my most important accomplishments. Since I arrived, I have been focused on creating a substantial endowment to fund the HTLI’s operations–a lengthy process that is finally wrapping up successfully. Even in the law school market downturn, this endowed money should allow us to maintain our services.

Other Accomplishments

* Curricular reform/certificate revisions. In 2010, we made two major changes to the high tech curriculum. First, the IP Survey course became the gateway course to the high tech curriculum, rather than having students start with the standalone doctrinal courses. Second, we updated the requirements to obtain the high tech law certificate for the modern era. Both changes have been quite successful. A majority of Santa Clara Law students now take the IP Survey course, and the number of certificate earners more than doubled after the change.

* The team. I can’t claim a lot of credit for hiring either Colleen Chien or Brian Love, but both have been major additions to our program. I did chair the search committee that hired Laura Norris, and she has delivered everything we’d hoped for and more. The HTLI has two of the best professionals in the business in Joy Peacock and Dorice Kunis, and I’m proud to work with both.

* New degree programs. We added a JD/MSIS, one of the few such offerings in the nation, and we recently established a joint JD/IP LLM that ambitious students can complete in 3 calendar years.

Noteworthy Events

I didn’t fully appreciate how much the director job would involve event planning. We organize or co-sponsor between a dozen and 20 events per year, so the cumulative tally over the past 8 years is “too many events to count.” Some event highlights:

* Bay Area Blawgers. Back before blogging became corporatized, we organized a series of successful face-to-face get-togethers for the early legal bloggers in the Bay Area.

* State of the Net West. Working with Tim Lordan and the advisory committee to the Congressional Internet Caucus, we had a string of events where members of Congress and other DC insiders engaged a Silicon Valley audience. Series speakers included Reps. Blackburn, Boucher, Chaffetz, Eshoo, Goodlatte, Honda and Lofgren; White House CTO Aneesh Chopra; and FTC Commissioner Julie Brill.

* IT, Ethics and Law series. This series predates me, but I love how it’s been a cross-disciplinary dialogue at the intersection of IT, ethics and law. Speakers over the years have included Julie Brill, Alex Macgillivray, Eben Moglen, Craig Newmark, Paul Ohm, Erika Rottenberg and Jonathan Zittrain.

* Federal Circuit hearing. In 2008, we had a 3 judge panel of the Federal Circuit hear oral arguments in 3 cases on campus.

* Passionate Patents. We had a performance of an opera about patent prosecution. Yes, really.

* Academic conferences.

Trademark Dilution Symposium. When 100 people showed up for a specialized topic like this, I began to appreciate how our audience liked geeky topics. Symposium issue.
Carterphone and Open Access in the Digital Era. Celebrating the 40 year anniversary of the Carterphone decision was a terrific and timely conference concept (unfortunately, this one didn’t gel as well as I’d hoped).
100 Year anniversary of 1909 Copyright Act. Our most popular conference to date (over 250 RSVPs) on one of our most highly specialized topics (a law that had been dying for 35 years). Because we had more RSVPs than seats, we literally had people calling in favors trying to get in the door. Symposium issue (such as that it was).
Exhaustion and First Sale in IP. Great topic, but we were slightly ahead of the curve with it. Symposium issue.
– Closed-door patent scholars workshop. Check out the roster of presenters: T.J. Chiang, Colleen Chien, Dennis Crouch, Kevin Collins, Jeanne Fromer, Peter Lee, Michael Risch and David Schwartz; with commentary from John Duffy, Jeff Lefstin, Ted Sichelman, Chester Chuang and others.
15 year anniversary of 47 USC 230. Perhaps my favorite event of this group. The energy at this conference was incredible. I still hear people talking about this one.
Patent Defense 2.0. When it comes to patent litigation, Silicon Valley is primarily a defense-oriented community, and it was fascinating to watch that community come together at this event.
Solutions to the Software Patent Problem. This conference was unusual because we didn’t try to balance the panels. Instead, we started with the premise that software patents were a problem and then asked two dozen bright thinkers how they’d fix the problem. We complemented this conference with a robust online Wired.com symposium describing many of the solutions for a lay audience. The news that Michelle Lee was hired as head of the USPTO Silicon Valley office broke at this conference.
15 year anniversary of DMCA. This was a great venue for the Silicon Valley Internet community to celebrate and commiserate about a law we love to hate.
WIPIP. This conference came at an exceptionally difficult time for me as we got my wife’s diagnosis just a month before the conference. Still, the event was filled with high points from beginning to end, starting with the pre-conference venture capital pitch event and continuing through the closing karaoke night where several dozen IP professors joined in a group singalong of Aqua’s Barbie Girl.

Hallmark features of our events

We take our events seriously, and over the years we’ve developed a few signature traits:

HTLI Slinky- Schwag. We love schwag! For us, good conference schwag meets strict design parameters: (1) not too heavy, (2) easy to stuff into carry-on luggage, (3) not breakable, (4) something a person would actually want to keep/use, (5) not too expensive (don’t want to violate government ethics rules), and (6) a little nerdy so as to reinforce our brand message. Mugs? No. Bags? No. Instead, over the years, our stalwart piece-o-schwag has been the highly coveted HTLI slinky. Making the HTLI slinky happen has been one of my best perks of being HTLI director. Other highlights include the SCU straws and the M&Ms with the faces of famous IP personalities.

– Party night. After we’re done with our official business, we love partying with IP academics! Highlights include WIPIP’s IP trivia contest and the legendary night of Dungeons & Dragons quests at the Internet Law WIP.

– Group photos. We always try to take group photos at work-in-progress events (examples: 1, 2). Talk about herding cats!

– Vegetarian/vegan food. Vegetarians and vegans never go hungry at our events.

– Speaker time limits. Our trains run ON TIME.

Media coverage of our program

Two of my favorite articles about the HTLI from the past 8 years:

* Santa Clara Law Magazine Fall 2009 issue (best viewed in Firefox)

* 2013 Recorder article

]]>
2
Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Five Things I’ve Learned About Lung Cancer (LinkedIn Cross-Post)]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1789 2014-05-10T00:23:06Z 2014-05-10T00:23:06Z [This is a cross-post of my first post as a LinkedIn "Influencer." If you dare, you can read the 140+ comments there, but they are about what you'd expect.]

In January, my wife was diagnosed with lung cancer. This was as shocking as it sounds. My wife is a 41 year old never-smoker vegetarian fitness instructor in otherwise excellent health. How could someone like her could get lung cancer?

Like most people, I didn’t know much about lung cancer before it hit home. Here are some of the key points I’ve since learned about lung cancer:

1) Non-smokers get lung cancer. Lots of them. You’ve seen the ads linking smoking and lung cancer. Like you, I assumed that meant only smokers got lung cancer. Instead, lots of non- and never-smoking Americans get lung cancer every year. Over 200,000 Americans are diagnosed with lung cancer every year, and about 20% of those never smoked. That means tens of thousands of American never-smokers get lung cancer every year.

2) Young women get lung cancer. Too many of them. My wife’s demographics are not unique among lung cancer patients. For unexplained reasons, lung cancer is striking younger women at increasing rates. Lung cancer among younger women is one of the most disturbing epidemics you haven’t heard of. It’s silently depleting a generation of women at their peaks.

3) Everyone wants a explanation. When I tell people that my wife has lung cancer, people often ask questions seeking some explanation for how it happened. Was it second-hand smoke? Radon? Genetics? Surely there must be a logical reason why my wife got such an unexpected disease. Unfortunately, we have no explanation except that sometimes bad things happen to good people.

4) Survival rates are abysmal. Lung cancer is an efficient killer. It’s the #1 most lethal cancer by far.

[Percent of deaths due to specific types of cancer, based on 2012 data for all Americans. Source: International Agency for Research on Cancer].

Five-year survival rates for all lung cancer patients are around 16%. (Contrast breast cancer’s 90% survival rate). For patients with advanced lung cancer, five-year survival rates are de minimis.

Why is lung cancer so lethal? First, lung cancer is often detected late. The most common symptom, a persistent cough, is easily overlooked or misdiagnosed. Second, lung cancer metastasizes easily, so it often turns into an even-harder-to-treat cancer like brain cancer. Third, advanced lung cancer is difficult or impossible to eradicate. Even if a patient with advanced lung cancer gets back a clean CT or PET scan, the lungs likely still contain cancer fragments too small to see. Fourth, lung cancer mutates a lot. The mutations mean a treatment will lose its effectiveness (often within a year or less), and the patient must then try a different treatment. At some point, there are no other treatment options to try.

5) Cancer management isn’t a “cure.” Various chemotherapies and targeted gene therapies can create windows of time where a lung cancer patient can live something resembling a normal life. To outsiders, this may look like the patient is “cured.” Instead, it’s just that the current drug treatment has brought a temporary normalcy–a calm period that will be eventually trumped by unpreventable mutations or metastizations.

BONUS: One more thing I’ve learned: The world is filled with incredibly kind people. Since we’ve announced my wife’s diagnosis, we have been overwhelmed by the generosity of others. Each day brings a new example of people going out of their way to support us. Gossip and the media often draw our attention to our society’s incivility, but unfortunately we let that overshadow the many acts of kindness by the true heroes who quietly make the world a better place.

My wife is blogging about her experiences with lung cancer. Check out “Every Breath I Take.”

]]>
0
Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Tikkun Olam In Action]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1773 2014-02-27T20:32:13Z 2014-02-27T18:34:58Z In response to my post about Lisa’s lung cancer, we have received hundreds of supportive emails, phone calls, office visits, Facebook comments, retweets and other expressions of support. I’m sorry we haven’t been able to respond to them all. I spent most of Tuesday crying in my office with the door closed from the many ways people took concrete steps to share our story and help us out. It is overwhelming in the most positive sense, a tidal wave of love and the best qualities of the human condition that lifts my spirit and makes me think about how I can be a better person. Among the many amazing responses we got, this email stood out. Someone who I barely know wrote me:
___

“…your post made me think for the first time about my history as a former smoker and how it may have impacted others like your wife, who were smart enough never to start, but who may well have been impacted. I’ve wondered ever I quit 22 years ago, whether my 1.5 ppd history would ultimately bite in the ass but I’ve never even considered its possible impact on innocent third parties. I’m not an inconsiderate or thoughtless person by nature but it wasn’t until I saw your post that I really viewed my own past smoking habit from that perspective. I wish I could apologize on behalf of all smokers who have potentially caused such unintended harm but I find that many current smokers are so heavily addicted that they are in denial of the health effects on those around them – even their unborn children – because to do otherwise would create (in my opinion) an undeniable moral obligation to quit. So I apologize for myself at least…”

___

Here’s how I responded:

“I don’t really know what to say in response to this email except thank you for writing such an insightful and heartfelt email. It means more to us than I can really say. Lisa wanted to get the word out about the risks of lung cancer, and an email like this makes me think she’s succeeded in ways I could have never anticipated. It’s nice of you to apologize, but totally unnecessary. Instead, to the extent you are thinking about the ways you can make choices that make the world a little better, that puts a huge smile on my face, and I owe you a huge thank you.”

___

I have loved all of the posts where you’ve shared our story with your friends and family. Not only have many of you said kind things about Lisa and me, but it means so much when you’ve highlighted some fact you’ve learned and helped explain it to your audience in your words. That raises awareness of the risks of lung cancer better than we ever could. As one example of the responses that have simply overwhelmed me with their kindness and thoughtfulness, see this blog post from long-time friend and colleague Bennet Kelly.

I haven’t been able to thank everyone individually, but I do promise to repay each and every one of these acts of kindness by paying it forward, as much as I can now, and more when my schedule gets more manageable.

*** Note: Tikkun Olam means “repair the world.” In Jewish tradition, we are born into a world with flaws. It is our responsibility to personally undertake to fix some of those flaws.

]]>
0
Eric Goldman <![CDATA[My Wife Has Lung Cancer. Read Her Story]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1764 2014-02-27T18:13:33Z 2014-02-25T19:54:23Z Alamar, Havana, Cuba, March 2013Nothing in life prepared me for the moment when the doctor told me my wife Lisa had lung cancer. We knew something was wrong with her; she had a persistent cough for weeks that the doctors couldn’t fix. But lung cancer? Lisa is only 41 years old, in otherwise excellent health, a vegetarian with a healthy diet, and a fitness instructor who taught demanding indoor cycling and pilates courses. And perhaps most importantly, Lisa never smoked or lived with smokers. How could she have lung cancer?

We’ve since learned that tens of thousands of Americans who never smoked, including a troubling number of young and healthy women, get lung cancer every year. Lung cancer kills more Americans than breast, prostate and colon cancers COMBINED, and the death toll for never-smoked lung cancer victims–about 30,000 Americans each year–is a major chunk of overall cancer deaths. However, you probably don’t hear much about these victims. Lung cancer is a ruthless and efficient killer. It’s hard to detect, so it’s typically diagnosed at a late stage, and it easily metastasizes, especially to the brain. As a result, lung cancer victims, including those who never smoked, often die before they can share their stories to the world.

This situation is changing. Blogging technology enables lung cancer victims to tell their stories first-hand, and recent improvements in treatment are helping lung cancer victims live a little longer–perhaps long enough to tell their stories.

As part of this broader phenomenon, Lisa has launched a blog, “Every Breath I Take.” Please check it out. Not only will the blog keep you informed about Lisa’s situation, but we hope it will give a voice to the many thousands of Americans dying each year from this silent killer. Emails were a big part of how Lisa and I communicated at the beginning of our relationship, and I fell in love with her in part because of her witty and conversational writing style. I’m glad that many of you will get to see that special side of her.

I understand that a blog post like this will likely engender many sympathetic emails and offers of help. We are grateful for the overwhelming support we’ve received. I don’t mean to be overly dramatic, but this outpouring has changed my worldview. It’s easy to be cynical about the human condition, but I’ve now experienced the other side: many people–close family members and virtual strangers–have gone out of their way to show us extraordinary kindness and thoughtfulness. It’s taught me a lot about the value of “paying it forward,” a lesson I hope to use extensively for the rest of my life.

If you are motivated to help out, here are my two requests of ways you can be most helpful:

1) I’d be grateful for your understanding if my email responses are short or curt and for my sporadic blogging. Lisa was the principal childcare provider, and I’ve taken over that responsibility for now. We are still working on longer-term childcare arrangements. Until we resolve that, my time is stretched very thin.

2) Please spread the word about Lisa’s blog and the reality that lung cancer isn’t just a “smoker’s disease.” Until we get past the “blame the victim” narrative, we won’t fully understand the disease and the victims who have it, nor will we make optimal investments in preventing and treating it.

]]>
8
Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Why I No Longer Respond to Unsolicited Inquiries About Legal Matters]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1757 2014-02-21T19:20:54Z 2014-02-21T19:20:54Z Several times a week, I get emails (and occasionally phone calls) from people inquiring about legal topics and asking me a question. If you’re reading this post, chances are you’ve made such an inquiry to me. Often, due to my expertise and research, I could easily help out the inquirer with links to a helpful URL or two, or a referral to an attorney who can help, or maybe even some general information about the law.

Back in the good old days, I used to freely reply to such inquiries. I felt like I could–and should–share my expertise in a way that cost me little and potentially provided a lot of help. It was about treating people as I would want to be treated.

The good old days are unfortunately over. Despite helping hundreds of people over the years with minor legal inquiries, I’ve changed my policy. Now, I won’t be able to respond to your inquiry or any follow-up inquiries.

Why the change? As the expression goes, it only takes one bad apple to spoil the barrel. I’ve had two recent situations where people who contacted me–essentially asking for a favor–have turned around and overclaimed that we formed an attorney-client relationship. In one situation, I simply made some referrals to attorneys who might help; in another, I was sent publicly available documents that the sender later (and, IMO, falsely) claimed were part of asking for my legal help with the case. In both, the overclaim of an attorney-client relationship interfered with my activities as a researcher and a blogger, i.e., my ability to do my job. As a bonus, usually the attorney-client overclaim is coupled with threats to notify the state bar or my dean or other folks, or otherwise to ruin my life.

As a result of the rare rotten apples, I have to assume all such inquirers are potential plaintiffs who will thank me by threatening to take my house and destroy my life–even though 99%+ are just well-meaning folks making fair requests of someone who probably could easily help. I’m so sorry to presume the worst when so few inquiries deserve it; it is unfair, and I wish I lived in a different world where trying to be a mensch wasn’t punished.

]]>
1
Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Winter 2014 Conference Schedule]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1748 2014-01-06T22:02:12Z 2014-01-05T17:25:07Z Here’s my upcoming roster of conferences and speaking engagements. As always, please let me know if you’d like to connect when I’m in your area:

* January 30: Whittier Law School (Orange County), “Why State Legislatures Shouldn’t Regulate Internet Privacy.”

* February 6-7: WIPIP, SCU.

* February 14: Santa Clara High Technology Law Journal Annual Symposium, Mountain View.

* February 27: University of Texas Austin, a talk on revenge porn. I’ll remain in Austin through March 1 for a trademark roundtable.

* March 8: Internet Law Work-in-Progress conference, New York Law School, Tribeca.

* March 9: SXSW, “The Fragile Law That Protects Online Speech” (about Section 230), Austin, Texas.

* [UPDATED] March 14: McCarthy Institute Trademark Conference, London/Oxford, England.

]]>
0
Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Zazzle Interviews My Daughter About Her DinaDesigns Store]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1726 2013-12-24T06:00:40Z 2013-12-22T17:43:40Z Sorry, proud dad alert! I previously announced Dina’s Flickr page and Zazzle store where she sells various items featuring her art. Zazzle noticed the store and asked to interview her (initially by phone until I pointed out that Dina is only 8). Read her interview. Reader comments have been heart-warming, such as:

* “Your designs are wonderful – so colorful and fresh!”

* “What a talented girl! I love her paintings. The skill at her age is impressive. And her imagination is lovely. It’s inspiring that her goal was to give to the SPCA. A great interview that cheered my morning.”

* “Adorable Alien: Read your Zazzle interview and am so impressed with your skill. I liked this painting and shared it on my facebook timeline.”

]]>
0
Eric Goldman <![CDATA[Announcing Dina’s Flickr Gallery and Zazzle Store]]> http://blog.ericgoldman.org/personal/?p=1717 2013-12-23T05:18:29Z 2013-11-30T17:33:49Z For the last few years, my daughter Dina has been taking classes at a local art school, Drawn2Art. I know I’m being a proud dad, but my view is that she has unique artistic gifts, and her new items routinely elicit appreciation when we post photos of them to Facebook.

We’ve now collected Dina’s art into a Flickr gallery. Remember that some of these works she created when she was only 5 years old! You can see how much she has advanced by comparing her more recent pieces, like her giraffe.

(All of these drawings, and more, are also posted to Lisa’s Facebook photo album, but the Facebook album isn’t freely accessible like Flickr is. I’m working with Lisa to pick up some straggler items that are posted to Facebook but haven’t made it to Flickr yet).

We’ve also created a Zazzle store where you can buy tchotchkes featuring her art. If you are so inclined, please NEVER pay full retail at Zazzle. Zazzle’s pricing model uses a high list price coupled with new discount codes almost daily. You can find current Zazzle discount codes here. If you like a particular art piece at Flickr but don’t see it offered on the item you want at Zazzle, just contact me and we can easily create the new item/drawing combo at Zazzle.

]]>
1