2H 2016 Quick Links, Part 1 (Special Election Edition)

I’ve already cast my ballot, and I hope you will vote too. I don’t normally wade into election politics but there have been several election issues that touch on topics of interest to this blog. So, for the first time,…

Deleting Comments to County Facebook Page May Violate First Amendment--Davison v. Loudoun County

Deleting Comments to County Facebook Page May Violate First Amendment–Davison v. Loudoun County

This is a case study on the problems that can arise when public records requirements meet modern forms of communications. On July 15, 2016, the Loudoun County Board of Supervisors held a public meeting. One of the supervisors elected to…

Some Comments on the CA/TX Attorneys’ General Prosecution of Backpage’s Executives

By now I’m sure you’ve heard that California Attorney General Kamala Harris is prosecuting three Backpage executives for pimping/conspiracy to pimp. This is the latest–and perhaps last–development in a decade-long effort by legislators, state AGs and local prosecutors to shut…

An Interesting Online Personal Jurisdiction Ruling (No, Really!)–Rotblut v. Terrapinn

Yes, I know “interesting personal jurisdiction case” is an oxymoron, but hear me out. Jef Rotblut worked at UBO (he has apparently since changed employers) and claimed he “had an ‘excellent reputation and recognized expertise at developing risk[-]averse trading systems…

House Passes Consumer Review Fairness Act

Last night, the House passed the Consumer Review Fairness Act. The Senate passed the nearly identical Consumer Review Freedom Act back in December. I’ll discuss in a moment the minor variations between the two. Because of these differences, the Senate…

Ninth Circuit Criticizes Attempts to Plead Around Section 230–Kimzey v. Yelp

[Note: Venkat represented Yelp in this case but was not involved in the preparation of this post.] For all of the drama associated with Section 230 jurisprudence this year–including in the Ninth Circuit–it’s easy to forget that Section 230 still…

"Kurt The CyberGuy" Loses Publicity Rights Claims Against TV Station--CyberGuy v. KTLA

“Kurt The CyberGuy” Loses Publicity Rights Claims Against TV Station–CyberGuy v. KTLA

Knutsson was a technology reporter and creator of the “CyberGuy” persona. He worked for TV station KTLA between 1996 and 2011. In 2005, he entered into an agreement with KTLA to be paid an annual salary of $325,000 a year…

Anti-Robocall Statute Violates First Amendment--Gresham v. Rutledge

Anti-Robocall Statute Violates First Amendment–Gresham v. Rutledge

Arkansas has a statute that prohibits: use a telephone for the purpose of offering any goods or services for sale, or for conveying information regarding any goods or services for the purpose of soliciting the sale or purchase of the…

Unfortunate Expansion of 'Failure to Warn' Exception to Section 230--Beckman v. Match

Unfortunate Expansion of ‘Failure to Warn’ Exception to Section 230–Beckman v. Match

You recall the Ninth Circuit’s Doe v. ModelMayhem (Doe #14 v. Internet Brands) ruling from earlier this year. It held that a website couldn’t invoke Section 230 against a claim that the site should have warned its users about potential…